Why you really need to go see Mogwai at the Hydro in December.

Scotland’s post-rock titans have drank plentifully from the fountain of musical longevity and output as they continue to churn out slabs of cacophonous minimalism.

Music of the kind of supreme quality that could only bear their name, almost 20 years after the release of debut studio album ‘Mogwai Young Team’.

And the band – fuelled as Stuart Braithwaite says out of “a fear of regular employment” – aren’t one to rest on their laurels, with this past year to date seeing them play ‘Atomic’ score shows to audiences across the UK, Europe, Japan and most recently in January in North America.

This, as well as offering up a collaborative soundtrack in 2016 for climate change film ‘Before The Flood’ with three Oscar winners in the form of Trent Reznor, his longtime collaborator Atticus Ross and Argentine film composer Gustavo Santaolalla.

And with the promise of a new album on the cards – recorded late last year at Tarbox Road Studios in Upstate New York (where, incidentally, 1999’s Come On Die Young was recorded) – it will no doubt serve as a perfect way to whet the appetite prior to their end of year mega-show at The Hydro in December.

Few bands would have the balls to announce a gig almost 11 months in advance. But Mogwai do. Especially a gig of such scale, where, after June 2015’s 2 night assault on the senses at The Barrowlands as part of their 20th anniversary shows, they are going for the Glasgow jugular.

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A gig which, if there ever was one, could be baptised with the term ‘Ned Free Zone’, and one which will no doubt represent the ultimate test of the venue’s sound levels potential.

Rarely, if ever, has a band and venue such a Cinderella glass slipper perfect fit as this one does, and it definitely tops the bill of gigs to go see in the city this year.

And with previous concerts offering support in the form of acts such as Sacred Paws (signed to their own Rock Action label), Loop, Prolapse, Pye Corner Audio, The Vaselines, Forest Swords, there’s extra reason to be excited. Indeed, already mooted as possible support have been the likes of Man of Moon and The Twilight Sad for The Hydro.

If you haven’t already, you can get your ticket here:

http://www.ticketmaster.co.uk/mogwai-the-sse-hydro-glasgow/venueartist/444745/795768

On our radar – West Princes

Actually, West Princes have been on our radar for the best part of 2016 thanks to a handful of great live performances in both Glasgow and Edinburgh throughout the year alongside gigs at festivals such as Electric Fields and Stag and Dagger to boot.

 

The Glasgow fourpiece – named after the Woodlands street flat they lived in while at the Art School – launched their debut single ‘Wet Bark Is A Slug’ on the Voidoid Archive label (brainchild of artist Jim Lambie) last week, celebrating the release with a short 2 date UK tour of both their native city and London, the first of which was a stellar performance at a packed out The Poetry Club in Finnieston alongside party starters Pleasure Bent.

 

With a distinct 70s folky vibe full of breezy, playful guitar lines and luscious harmonies, the ‘Wet Bark Is A Slug’ video features the song against the work of Estonian animator Priit Parn’s 1984 film Time Out, resulting in a delightfully charming and captivating marriage of imagery and sound.

 

The Paul Simon/Vampire Weekend’s ‘Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa’ vibe is one that will be broadcast to audiences Scotland wide thanks to it being chosen as ‘Single Of The Week’ on BBC Scotland’s The Janice Forsyth Show, and we hope it serves as a platform for greater things in 2017 for the West Princes guys.
Check out the video here.

 

 

10 best tracks of 2016

Charles Bradley – Aint It A Sin

The man described as the “closest living equivalent to James Brown” by Pitchfork released 3rd album ‘Changes’ back in April, with its title taken from Bradley’s majestic, heart-wrenching cover of the Black Sabbath classic. The whole album is drenched in retro-soul sounds, peppered with post-funk grooves and hip hop elements, forming the perfect background to Bradley’s signature garble. This, for me, a particular highlight of many to be found in the soul star’s best release to date.

 

Massive Attack feat Tricky – Take It There

Forming part of the band’s Ritual Spirit EP release in January this year, Take It There featured the long awaited return of Adrain ‘Tricky’ Thaws – his first appearance on a Massive Attack record since 1994’s Protection. An intoxicating, trip hop waltz that reaffirms the assertion that Massive Attack are the masters of their own creation.

 

Minor Victories – A Hundred Ropes

A refreshing addition to the ‘supergroup’ tag, Minor Victories, comprising Rachel Goswell from Slowdive, Stuart Braithwaite from Mogwai, Justin Lockey from Editors and James Lockey of Hand Held Cine Club. Their self titled, 10 track debut release arrived in June to much critical acclaim, and the organic, lush synth-pop orchestral sound of first track ‘A Hundred Ropes’ made for a surprising and thoroughly welcome addition to this year’s music scene.

 

Van Ts – Blood Orange

Glasgow’s premier surf rock exporters The Van Ts – based around twin sisters Hannah and Chloe Van Thompson – have taken the city, and Scotland, by storm in 2016, thanks to their energetic shows, surefire swagger and most importantly, scuzzy, scorching musical output. None more so evident with the chaotic, raw beauty of  ‘Blood Orange’, taken from July EP ‘A Coming of Age’. Ones to watch for sure in 2017.

 

Mitski – How Deep Is Your Love (cover)

2016 has without doubt been the year of Mitski, with her Puberty 2 album appearing in the top 10 of album lists both in the UK and the US. Her fourth release is more a personal statement than album proper, with the Brooklyn singer-songwriter addressing her own views of the world with vigorous lyricism washed over with folk-punk, emo, and even 60s pop hooks. A live favourite, ‘How Deep Is Your Love’ takes Calvin Harris’s original and adds a velvety, rich layer with teeth.

 

Deutsche Ashram – Little Matter (extended version)

Perhaps the best find of 2016, Ajay Saggar’s (King Champion Sounds/The Bent Moustache) new project – a two piece with singer Merinde Verbeek…, released LP ‘Deeper and Deeper’ in November this year. Full of transfixing waves of shoegazey post-punk vibes that cut deep on first listen, Verbeek’s vocals and Saggar’s industrial soundscapes marry perfectly to deliver dark swathes of experiemental dream pop of the highest quality.


Bon Iver – 33 “GOD”

Stark and stirring, Bon Iver returned to our ears with perhaps his most powerful and eclectic music to date in the form of 3rd LP ’22, A Million’. Rich in experimental textures that speak of optimism and melancholy in equal measure, 33 “GOD” features samples from the likes of Paolo Nutini, The Browns, Sharon Van Etten and Lonnie Holley, and perfectly encapsulates Iver’s hard to pin down ragged soundscapes – the likes of which only Bon Iver could create.


White – Step Up

If there’s a party going on in Glasgow, White will either have started it or will appear at some point in the night, such is the presence they have carved out for themselves in the city. Sharp dressers and even sharper musicians, their infectious, frenetic disco pop takes distinct elements of LCD Soundsystem, Prince and Franz Ferdinand and wraps it up in a shimmering cloak of attitude. The aggressive, pulsating Step Up – from recent EP ‘Cuts That Don’t Bleed’ marks a exception to the rule, and in doing so showcases the band’s talent for experimentation and desire to chart their own course.

Ulrika Spacek – Beta Male

A standout of British experimental band Ulrika Spacek’s debut LP, ‘The Album Paranoia’ – released in February this year, was for me the song of 2016. Labelled by DIY as “the soundtrack to a trip through space-time”, the band’s sound is an abrasive mix of distortion, repetition and fuzz that made their debut release nothing short of remarkable – as evidenced by the epic, 6+ minutes of  ‘Beta Male’.


Anohni – Drone Bomb Me

Sung from the point of view of a cilivian, the second single o Anohni’s ‘Hopelessness’ release is an intimate portrayal of the faceless nature of drone warfare, against synth beats provided by Hudson Mohawke and Oneohtrix Point Never. Seductive and sublime in equal measure, the subversive quality of the release marked a level of beauty few, if any other artist captured this year.

SOMEONE THINKS THEY’VE FOUND A NEW BANKSY IN HELSINKI

Helsinki locals are quietly excited about the possibility of a new work by the elusive Banksy having been uncovered in their city, which would represent the first reported by the artist since the appearance of his’Les Miserables’ protest piece at the French Embassy in London back in January of this year.

The graffiti (below), which depicts a standing brown bear, was found under a railway bridge and although it was first noticed in late August by a local resident, it is still visible today.

bear

Although not a de facto symbol of the country, bears are a very popular animal in Finland. For ancient Finnish people they were considered a sacred and ‘totem’ animal, and it is estimated that there are around 1200-1500 left in the wild, mostly within Eastern Finland’s densely forested zone.

The location (see below) of the bear is approximately 4 miles north of the city centre, next to  Pohjois-Haaga station. And although the site lies around 600 metres from Helsinki underground record label Hold On Records HQ, its lack of proximity to the centre raises strong doubts about the possibility of it being the authentic article.

new-helsinki

Interestingly, this year’s Flow Festival – which takes place over a weekend in August in the former industrial area of Suvilahti – was headlined by a certain Bristol trip-hop group Massive Attack (alongside Young Fathers) on August 12th, adding more credence to the rumours that Banksy is actually the band’s Robert Del Naja, or at least a collective headed by him.


The local who came across the work, who gave her name as M.P. said, “I don’t know much about graffiti, but I have never seen any graffiti of that quality or style in Finland before. Finnish graffiti artists have a very different style. I saw the work for the first time at the end of August. I took a picture of it because it is so unusual to see this kind of graffiti here in Helsinki.”

If – by a large stretch of the imagination – it was confirmed as a genuine Banksy piece, it wouldn’t be the first time the artist has used a bear in his work. The artist could be claimed to have something of a penchant for the furry, mountain dwelling animal, by analysing his previous works, of which there are four.

Firstly, his ‘Mild Mild West’ mural, created in Bristol in 1999, depicts a teddy bear throwing a Molotov cocktail at three riot police.

mild

Cut to 2002 and Banksy produced a controversial work for Greenpeace, entitled ‘Jungle Book Execution’ illustrating the execution of various jungle book characters – including Baloo the bear – to highlight the issue of deforestation. The image appeared on billboards and leaflets for the NGO throughout February and March of that year.

bank

Again in his native Bristol in 2003, Banksy turned to the image of a bear to create ‘Pooh Bear’, a stencil depicting EH Shepard’s Winnie The Pooh  with his foot caught in a trap next to a tipped over jar of money.

A canvas print of the stencil was bought by a New Zealand tourist for £35 from a stall in Central Park during Banksy’s “Better Out Than In’ month long New York public project in 2013, and was subsequently sold for £56,250.

pooh

Also, a poem attributed to the artist entitled ‘The Bear and The Bee’ was uncovered on a council bin in Notting Hill, London, in 2005.

bearbee

Perhaps with this new work we are able to advance another reason behind the suggestion that Banksy is indeed Robert Del Naja but, until such a theory is confirmed by the man himself, we have to bear with him remaining anonymous.

FIDEL WAS A MANIC STREET PREACHER – the concert that signalled a shift in Cuban culture

On March 25th this year The Rolling Stones played a ‘historic’ concert in Havana, Cuba, to more than 400 000 people. Many reported the concert as a date that would go down in history, as Mick Jagger’s men became the first rock and roll band to play a free outdoor concert on such a scale in the city.

Such was the hype for the occasion, Barack Obama’s visit to Havana earlier the same week – the first by a serving US president in 88 years – was billed as merely a ‘warm up act’to the Stone’s show.

But through all the razzmatazz and Jagger hip shaking, it wasn’t that historic. Just ask Manic Street Preachers. They beat The Stones to the punch by a mere 15 years, becoming the first major Western rock act to perform in the city since the Cuba revolution in 1959 and the first Western music act in 22 years to perform in Havana. And not only that, the recently deceased Cuban leader Fidel Castro was in the audience.

manics

The date was Saturday 17th February 2001 in Havana’s Carlos Marx theatre. The platform from where the Manic’s gave their concert the very one that Fidel Castro gave countless speeches from against what he called ‘Yankee imperialism’ in his time as Cuban leader.

The timing couldn’t have been better, coming not long after a ban on Western music was lifted, and Castro’s scheduled attendance at the gig was seen by Cuban commentators as way for him to show the world that his country, Cuba, was changing.

It was billed as win-win for both, a convenient promotional campaign against an honest political commitment on the part of the Manic Street Preachers.

manic-1

At the end of 1999 the government started a campaign of cultural promotion, with literature, plastics and music included in new ‘university for everyone’ projects, alongside transmissions on state TV of English, literature and history classes.

This sparked appearances by Fidel at cultural inaugurations and events, appearances which were deemed surprising considering Castro spent years distancing himself from Cuban cultural life.

The Manics gig is heralded as the second step in a process of using music as a beacon of the visible change being engineered by Castro, as two months earlier on the 20th anniversary of John Lennon’s death on 8th December 2000, he unveiled a bronze statue in a Havana park of the Beatles singer/guitarist.

lennon

At the ceremony for Lennon’s statue, Castro told reporters, “I share his dreams completely. I too am a dreamer who has seen his dreams turn into reality.”

El mandatario, quien se mantuvo durante años bastante apartado de la vida cultural cubana, ha asistido en los últimos meses a casi todas las inauguraciones y clausuras de distintos eventos y a espectáculos.

And with respect to the Manic Street Preachers gig,  Castro himself wasn’t an all too passive observer, with the then 74 year old standing to applaud the Manic’s song Baby Elian – named after the Cuban child at the centre of a custody dispute with US based relatives and one which regards the US as ‘the devil’s playground.’

It was a concert that literally shook the theatre, with the seats vibrating every time drummer Sean Moore hit his kit. So loud in fact, that some older members of the government were seen with their hands covering their ears.

Backed by a 8m x 13m Cuban flag backdrop – one which Nicky Wire confirmed was used as a ‘gesture of solidarity’, the 5000 strong throng of Cuban youths in attendance, alongside Castro, were treated to an hour of music as the Manics powered through songs off their sixth album, Know Your Enemy.

The concert, unlike that of The Stones, was not a free event. Instead, tickets were distributed out by the Cuban Music Institute and Cultural Ministry to students of music schools, pre-university students and invited guests – dubbed ‘well mannered’ guests by observers. The cost for each ticket was 25 centivos – approximately 17 pence.

The British rock band Manic Street Preachers perfo

It took a while for the crowd to get into the music, but, as those in attendance suggested, the sheer volume of noise created by the Manics won them over. Although the main mood of the night was one of curiosity rather than hysteria, with the loudest cheer of the evening reserved for Castro’s entrance.

“That the president of the island comes to this concert is truly a revolution,” said Gil Pla, a singer with local rock group Joker, who was at the concert. “For a long time, we were catalogued as anti-socials, but this shows that now we are OK, they have realized that rock is culture too.”

maniccuba2

Castro chatted with the band before their performance, where it is reported Nicky Wire, fearing for Fidel’s hearing, told him: “It might be a bit loud tonight,” to which Castro replied: “Will it be as loud as war?”While singer James Dean Bradfield explained via a translator that he was nervous as Castro was mentioned in the song Let Robeson Sing (‘Went to Cuba to meet Castro, never got past sleepy Moscow’).

Fidel stayed for the whole concert, sitting next to his Minister for Culture Abel Prieto – a man who, in times of rock and roll subversion as the authorities considered it diversionary and a bad influence on young people declared his love of the Beatles.

It was subsequently reported how one of those responsible for bringing the Manics to the country noted his surprise at how much Castro actually knew about the work of the Welsh band. All the more remarkable considering Fidel’s previous observations that Western rock music was a threat to the socialist system and the incarnation of ‘decadent values’ of the West.

The gig was made possible thanks to the intervention of MP Peter Hain, a Manics fan who first met the band during the campaign for a Welsh assembly and who used his contacts to convince the Cubans of their left-wing credentials.

The day after the show, the Manics appeared on the front page of the Communist Party daily paper Granma, as they toured various points of interest on the island as if visiting dignitaries participating in an official state visit

Prior to the Manic’s show, the last Western band to play in Havana was back in 1979, when Billy Joel and Kris Kristofferson defied the cultural embargo of Cuba to play.

INTERVIEW: Black Rebel Motorcycle Club’s Leah Shapiro on getting healthy and keeping the beat going.

This year represents 15 years since San Francisco’s Black Rebel Motorcycle Club released their debut B.R.M.C album. A true milestone for a band in constant pursuit of producing pure, unadulterated rock and roll, they have, in recent years, literally went through hell and back. Firstly, with the death of Robert Levon Been’s father – and BRMC sound engineer – Michael Been, in 2010, followed by the more recent news in 2014 that drummer Leah Shapiro required treatment for Chiari malformations found in her brain.

For Denmark born Leah – former drummer with Dead Combo and The Ravonettes – the thought of not being able to pick up her sticks in the face of her surgery and subsequent recovery was as dark a road to go down as there is for any musician.

“That was a pretty fucking scary thought. The whole year and a half of touring Spectre i had so many problems. I was losing my mind or seriously losing my ability to play the way that I was used to which was pretty scary. I guess there was a sense of relief in finding out why that was happening cause I was kinda going crazy over it . Like every night I would feel like it was flying around in a roller coaster while trying to play drums at the same time. The recovery process was pretty brutal and there was also the fear of how everything was going to feel after it.”


As luck would have it, the surgeon tasked with drilling into her brain happened to be a BRMC fan himself, and he was able to fine tune a ‘drum recovery’ process that enabled Leah to come back to almost full health.

“Yeh he was a fan of the band, it was fucking awesome. He was really incredibly helpful and he wrote out about a whole new programme which I started about three months after the surgery to get back on the drums. Had I not had that I’d have been completely fucking lost. I mean I would have no way of knowing what my limits where or how to pace myself or a what a responsible way to getting back to here was at all so it was really helpful.”

Serendipity or not, her long road from sleepy Aarhus in her native Denmark to life in LA via New York as one third of one of the best rock and roll bands of the last two decades is one that had a little to do with a certain incident with a bird in New York’s Times Square.

“I was working this shitty fucking office job in Times Square and I’d just gotten out of the Subway and like this bird just fell out of the sky dead in front of me. That was kind of a moment when i was like ‘Ok I’ve gotta not be doing this any more, anything else is better than this shit,’ and that kind of led to me joining Dead Combo which was really what opened the door for both BRMC and The Ravonettes – I think the first show I did with Dead Combo was opening with The Ravonettes and then we got to do some BRMC shows during their Baby 81 tour and i stayed in touch with Rob and here we are.”

It’s not often musicians get to support a band on tour before making the transition to become part of that band and its something that’s not lost on Leah, one that gives her a heightened sense of just what makes BRMC who they are and what they represent.

“It was kind of interesting to get to tour with them with an opening band before I joined them. I remember being in the crowd watching and there was this really special energy and, like, some sort of vibe that I’d never really seen before live with other bands. I watched the shows every night and I couldn’t get tired of it. It was always really exciting that you didn’t hear the songs as it is on the records, the set changed from night to night and always had a different element to it depending on what the room was like any given night. Now, every night we play I hope that even though I’m behind the drums I hope that energy is still the same one that I could feel.”

leah

Having just completed a 16 date autumn US co-headlining tour with Death From Above 1979 – alongside Deap Vally, Shapiro is finding it great being back in the saddle with the band after such a long period of recovery from her brain surgery.

“Yeh I mean this is probably my first proper tour where I’ve been fully healed up from my injuries and shit so it’s is a nice feeling just to play without all of those issues. We’ve toured with Deap Vally before so we know them and the Death From Above guys really well, so its probably been one of my favourite tours as far as the lineup and people.”

And although the present musical landscape seems bereft of bands that share a similar approach to pure, no holds barred rock and roll like BRMC do, Leah isn’t one to start complaining, especially given her love of both of their current touring partners, Deap Vally and Death From Above.

“I’m not that frustrated, I think just being on tour with the awesome bands and watching them kick ass every night kind of takes away some of the frustration away – you get a little jaded but there’s plenty of cool stuff going on just maybe not in the mainstream. Its hard enough at the best of times for bands.”

With a new album most likely in the early part of 2017, the tour has given the band the chance to come up with and road test some new material.

“We’ve always used soundchecks to kind of at least get the process of new ideas started and we have like a million little shitty iPhones; recording our new ideas. It’s a cool setting to start the writing process when your on a big stage with a big sound. Everything sounds better than being in the little confined tiny rehearsal space so its a little bit more fun.”

And with the signs all pointing in the right direction, Leah is quietly confident of a return to a full touring schedule next year in support of what will be the band’s eighth record.

“We’ve been testing out two of the new songs which we’ve done in the studio prior to starting this tour and when we finish up next week it’ll be back in the rehearsal studio writing again and hopefully recording and then we will be back out on the road before we know it.”

brrr

The last few years haven’t been easy on the band, with, alongside Leah’s diagnosis, surgery and subsequent recovery, the death of bandmate Robert Levon Been’s father Michael in 2010 – after he suffered a heart attack backstage at a festival in Belgium.

The loss was hard to take for Leah, who credits Been’s father with her progression as a drummer, thanks to his own unique training regime he placed on her when she joined BRMC following Nick Jago’s departure back in 2008.

“A big part of me getting to where I am now as a drummer was Michael putting me through an epic boot camp when i first started with the band. i wasn’t super happy at the time. It was pretty intense but it definitely helped shape my playing and my approach to music in general. He sort of got me to be a little bit more free and I kind of learned to be OK with the mistakes that were going to happen inevitably both in recording and live onstage and learned just kind of go with it and make the fucked up parts work to your advantage, if that makes sense.”

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For Leah, what has happened is that the band have pulled together more than ever in the face of such tragedy.

“I mean we’ve gone through some pretty insane shit before. We spend a lot of time together so we are all very close and i feel like there’s more of a family vibe than other bands I’ve played with in the past and I like that. A lot of the guys that are on the road with us have been with the band for as long as I have or even longer so there’s that whole element to it as well. I suppose we are our own kind of weird little dysfunctional family (laughing).”

The story goes that Leah learned around 40 songs in two weeks when she first joined the band midway through their tour off the back of the Baby 81 album, and ever since then, Leah has taken more and more of a creative role alongside bandmates Peter Hayes and Robert Levon Been with regards to new material.

“In the beginning i was playing all the material that already existed and when I first started I just tried to mimic the drumming as much as i possibly could to make the transition not like too awkward for Rob and Pete and I guess for the audience as well. I think that when we first started writing Beat The Devil’s Tattoo I started to kind of observe what the process was and figure out my place in it. So its now its been like 8 and a half years or something like that so I’m a little bit more comfortable than I was!”

Her footprint on the band’s material is more than present, not just through her military like – pounding drums – which formed the creative starting point to the development of lead single ‘Let The Day Begin’ from Spectre – a cover of Robert’s dad’s band The Call’s original 1989 release. Her interest in literature and poetry has borne fruit lyrically, her input stamped all over the band’s last two album releases.

“Well at the time when I first got to LA, Rob and I were living in this like, sort of one of those furnished short term apartments and I happened to have some of my books my dad had given to me and some that I’d bought myself. So they were around and I remember showing him things. “Annabel Lee” (from 2011’s ‘Live in London’ release) came out of that. It’s not like an intentional thing but when its around I guess it hopefully influences us but it’s not something I try to force on anybody.”

Interestingly given the high intensity required to provide the engine for BRMC’s motoring sound, Leah feels that playing live she often finds herself in a trance-like, meditative state, as the dreamy ‘Alive’, from BRMC’s debut release – and Leah’s favourite song to play – illustrates.

“Well I mean there’s a lot of repetition and a lot of focus on the flow and feel of it so when I really focus in on it and I’m having a good day when I’m playing well It gets really transitory really quickly and a lot of the music – the more psychedelic stuff – it really lends itself to that. Like you kind of float into some other place which is nice. It’s nice to stop worrying about how your are supposed to be feeling, it just kind of happens.”

Brought up listening to her American father’s record collection, she wasn’t the typical wannabe drummer who, from an early age, was banging tabletops and boxes with anything they could find their hands on.

“I started I guess a little bit later than most people would have, but I just kinda immediately got obsessive about it. I tried to learn other instruments and I completely fucking sucked at it and it didn’t feel natural to me at all and I remember the first day playing the drums it just felt natural to me.”

And with no doubt a few UK dates to pencil in for next year with the release of their new album, Leah is keen to get back out in front of British audiences – even if that means dodging the odd flying pint.

“Oh yeh it’s just so rowdy and fun I love that. I like a good drunk crowd throwing beers at us (laughs) although usually they don’t hit me so that’s why i don’t mind it! I remember Rob getting hit with a beer right in the face in Glasgow at the Barrowlands, I think on the 2010 tour. Maybe next time it’ll be me although it’s a little harder to hit me. I guess that will be the challenge for next year at our shows.”

5 of the worst things to happen to music in Glasgow/Scotland

Glasgow is, in recent years, happy to report as clean a bill of health as it has ever had, musically speaking. With a seemingly never ending conveyor belt of talent coming out of the city, it’s position at the forefront of Scottish music allows it to stand head and shoulders above most other cities in the UK, perhaps even London. However, like any success story, there has been the odd rough patch to upset the smooth.

Here’s 5 things about music in Glasgow/Scotland that have caused a mixture of outrage, disappointment and desire to vomit your dinner up.

     1. The closure of The Arches

When one of the UK and Europe’s most revered cultural and club venues shut down, it sent shock waves far and wide. A Glasgow institution, the 2,400 capacity venue became a hotbed of creativity right from the word go, when it opened its doors as a theatre way back in 1991, before morphing into a gig venue and club space – one which regularly found itself amongst the best in the world lists. Sorely missed by those who frequented the unique space underneath Central Station.

the arches

     2. Any T in the Park after, perhaps, 2008

Scotland’s ‘premier’ music festival is, lets be honest, a festival in appearance and name only – with lineups in recent years resembling a playlist at Campus on Sauchiehall St. Once a place of joyful frustration in trying to decide between cracking bands that shared the same time slots, those of a ‘real’ music persuasion looked on in disgust this year as Calvin Harris spun ‘Bits and Pieces’.  Just ask LCD Soundsystem, who played a headline slot to less people than a Michelle McManus karaoke gig upstairs in The Horseshoe Bar on a Monday night.Suppose Geoff Ellis has done everyone a favour, we have all discovered the joys of other festivals such as Primavera or Bilbao BBK.

t-in-the-park

     3. Anything George Bowie has ever done

The pied-piper of the coke and MD 20/20 brigade has been offending people’s ears ever since he started with Radio Clyde way back when, with his ‘GBX’ experience show on a Saturday night acting as a war cry for the Kyle’s and Debbie’s of Glasgow to start causing it on the streets of the city centre before, during or after they get their rave on. The last straw for many was the untimely, tragic death of David Bowie, with his ardent followers rubbing salt into the wound by confusing Bowie with Mr Radio Clyde, tweeting that ‘they are gonna miss GBX on a Saturday night’. Where’s the sick bag.

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     4. When they pulled the plug on Connect Festival

Boasting a location that put all other festivals to shame on the banks of Loch Fyne at Inverary Castle, Connect festival. The boutique festival (limited to 20,000 tickets) seemed a perfect antidote to the much bigger T, with a relaxed atmosphere and amazing food ticking all the boxes. 2007’s stellar bill requires a double take even now looking back at it, with Bjork, LCD Soundsystem, Beastie Boys, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Mogwai, Idlewild and many, many other great artists. Granted, 2008 wasn’t as strong – but the setting and non-music related offerings still made it a welcome addition to the festival calendar.

connect

    5. Avicii’s concert at Bellahouston Park

A night which can only be described as a national embarrassment, brought to the city in 2013 thanks to the guys who run Glasgow Summer Sessions. With more than a passing resemblance to America’s presidential race, Avicii must have resembled a Trump-like figure spewing out garbage after garbage, energised by a toothless, non educated support in the form of every bam from Dumfries to Dingwall. With papers saying the gig quickly into ‘drink and drug’ fuelled bedlam, its reported that residents in Mosspark Boulevard planted crosses and garlic in their front gardens in a vain attempt to stop the vampires from shaggin’ in them after the gig.

avicci

9 things about Glasgow and music that you maybe didn’t know.

1 – Elton John turned up at a party once steamboats in Blairdardie

Yip, one of the biggest selling music artists in the world was once managed by a Glaswegian called John Reid. And when visiting the city at the height of his fame in the late 1970s, the author of mega-hits such as ‘Rocket Man’ turned up at a party put on by pals of Reid at the high flats in Keal Crescent in Blairdardie with a carryout. Wonder if he was still standing after that night.

 

keal

 

2 – A band called Pink Floyd once supported a guy called Jimi Hendrix

Yip, this actually happened, at a show in Green’s Playhouse on Renfield St in 1967. With Syd Barret still in the band, Pink Floyd didn’t exactly endear themselves to the Glasgow public, being bottled off after they chose not to play their ‘hits’ such as See Emily Play. Hendrix also had the curtain pulled down on him midway through his set, after the management didn’t take well to his sexually suggestive guitar movements.

 

jimi

 

3 –  Alex Kapranos from Franz Ferdinand used to deliver curries for Mother India in his Fiat Panda.

Yip, the Franz Ferdinand front-man was the man who was sent out with your hot curry back in the days before he hit the big time alongside Bob, Nick and Paul with their debut 2004 album release. And not just any curry. Perhaps the best in the city in the form of Mother India in Glasgow’s west end. The ‘Take Me Out’ singer must have loved a take-out himself.

 

mother

 

4. Neil Young once busked outside Central Station

Yip, and if you didn’t know this one, then you must have been living on the moon. Before his show with Crazy Horse in 1976 at the city’s Apollo Theatre, a local camera crew were assigned to film some “funky shit footage” (Young’s words) of him and the band in Glasgow. It was Young’s idea to head down to Central station with his banjo and harmonica to play some music and see if anyone recognised him – in between asking people where the Bank of Scotland was. This, not long after one of either him or his band set fire to the paper table decorations at the Albany Hotel, nearly burning the whole thing down.

 

 

5. Courtney Love demanded a bath at a party in West Princes St

Yip, another party, this time not far from the city centre. After the former wife of Kurt Cobain played a gig in the city in the early 1990s with her band Hole, she turned up at a party in Eugene Kelly of The Vaseline’s gaff, and promptly told everyone there that she wanted a bath. Probably from all the pints that were lobbed in her direction.

 

love

 

6. The ‘Jimmy’ from Amy Macdonald’s ‘This Is The Life’ is actually called Graeme. 

OK so not the biggest of scoops, but one nonetheless. The title song off Macdonald’s 2007 debut album sees her sing a line about someone “waiting outside Jimmy’s front door”, and just in-case you are in Asda and hear the tune on the instore radio and you think, “Who is this Jimmy guy she is bangin on about”, well, now you know. Presumably, this was written in respect of the aftermath of a mad party somewhere, knowing ‘Jimmy’ as I do. Anyway, he used to play drums in The Apple Scruffs, so any excuse to stick one of their songs on the blog.

 

 

 

7. Bobby Gillespie’s step mum owns a dog grooming shop

Clutching at straws a bit here, but important to know some might find it. The shop is called, wait for it, ‘Grooming Marvellous’ and is situated on Cathcart Road in the south side of the city.  Rock and roll indeed. No doubt there’s a few poodles that call in at the shop with hair like he had back in the day when he played drums for TJMC.

 

 

8. There’s an Arctic Monkeys guitar pedal at the bottom of The Clyde

The first gig of their first ever UK tour  in March 2004 saw the Sheffield band play at Glasgow’s Barfly venue on the Broomielaw, remember that? Playing with them was a band called Raising Kane, and a series of disagreements between the two resulted in both bands launching each other’s guitar pedals into the adjacent Clyde river. The next day they played in Carlisle, and, off the back off their first ever Radio 1 play, the gig sold out. The rest, as we know, is history.

 

 

9. Oasis once supported the Verve at the Cathouse

Yip, of all places you could have seen these two bands in Glasgow, the Cathouse would probably come up last on your list. The alternative music club on Union St played host to two iconic groups of British music in December 1993, when Oasis supported the Verve on their UK tour prior to the release of their debut album, A Storm in Heaven. Apparently only a few folk turned up to see Oasis, and most of them thought they were pretty average. Funny how things change. Oasis released a live version of ‘I Am The Walrus’ from the show, as a B-side to Cigarettes & Alcohol the next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did Adele rip off BRMC with her mega-hit Skyfall?

Adele is one of the world’s most bankable singers, possessing a voice that has seen her graduate from performing arts student to full on superstar, thanks to the success of her trio of albums, 19, 21 and 25, albums which together have sold over 100 million copies.

The 28 year old’s songs surround the themes of heartbreak and relationships, with hits like ‘Hello’ and ‘Rumour Has It’ generating a popularity reflective of her status as ‘the finest singer of her generation’.

But, amidst all the glory and adulation, exists the rumour that she bent the rules somewhat in the creation of one of her biggest hits, Skyfall, the theme from the James Bond movie of the same name.

The song has sold more than 2 million copies worldwide, earning Adele an Academy Award for Best Original Song alongside a Golden Globe in the same category and the Grammy for Best Song Written for Visual Media in 2014.

The Oscar win, funnily enough, came after Adele’s song trumped three other soundtrack numbers, one of which being – wait for it – ‘Suddenly’ from the film Les Miserables.

But listeners on Youtube have noticed that the song bears a quite strong resemblance to the song ‘Suddenly’ by the American rock-and-roll band Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, a hit from their 2003 album Take Them On, On Your Own.

Lyrically, Skyfall is dark and moody, with a heavy orchestration that effectively captures the real James Bond ‘feeling’ of the Shirley Bassey era theme songs. Co writer Paul Epworth stated that the song is about “death and rebirth”, saying “It’s like, when the world ends and everything comes down around your ears, if you’ve got each other’s back, you can conquer anything. From death to triumph, that was definitely something we set out to try and capture.”

On the other hand, ‘Suddenly’ by BRMC doesn’t speak of all too dissimilar themes; themes concerning dark days, impending judgement, the sky and, most importantly, bitter love.

Perhaps any possible allegation labelled at Adele is best one of ‘aiding and abetting’, as part of a writing duo alongside producer Paul Epworth, who has produced acts similar to BRMC, artists such as Bloc Party, Primal Scream and Death From Above 1979 – who are themselves currently on tour with BRMC.

Epworth also worked with The Big Pink on their second album, ‘Future This’. BRMC’s guitarist/singer Robert Been also worked with the band, contributing to their 4 song EP ‘Empire Underground’.

This isn’t the first time Adele has been accused of ripping off other people’s tracks. Tom Waits fans believe her song ‘Hello’ shares a lot of similarities – lyrically – with Waits’s 1973 hit ‘Martha’.

Meanwhile, fans of Turkish/Kurdish singer Ahmet Kaya believe Adele ripped off Kaya’s 1985 song ‘Acilara Tutunmak (Clinging to Pain)’ with her own ‘Million Years Ago’ track off her 25 album.

Listen to both here and make up your own mind:

Caught live – Ulrika Spacek, The Hug and Pint

Apparently, London-based five piece Ulrika Spacek only play Glasgow on Sunday nights, as singer Rhys Edwards attested too midway through their set at The Hug and Pint.

Even against the threat of a low turn out with their return to the city coinciding with Falkirk troubadours Arab Strap’s second 20th anniversary show at a sold out Barrowlands, fans turned out in numbers to ensure the venue felt pretty packed.

Many presumably there on the strength of the airplay Ulrika Spacek have received on BBC Radio 6 by the likes of Steve Lamacq, while others making the visit off the back of their impressive support slot for DIIV at SWG3 earlier in the year.

ulrika

For all those who did make it, they were not to be disappointed. Spacek seemed genuinely happy to be back in Glasgow, and the intimate setting of the basement venue felt a perfect fit for their raw, atmospheric sound.

Playing against a projection of hypnotic, psychedelic visuals, the band burst to life with new A-side  ‘Everything: All The Time’, and, with little let up, proceeded to work their way through their debut album ‘The Album Paranoia’.

Tracks such as ‘I Don’t Know’, ‘She’s a Cult’ and ‘Beta Male’ saw Spacek at their own distinctive, gnarly, lo-fi best, not forgetting a face-melting rendition of ‘NK’ and the fantastic ‘There’s A Little Passing Cloud In You’.

Although ‘The Album Paranoia’ is in itself a work of near majestic talent, its live that Spacek really show off their strengths as composite musicians. For a band on their 23rd gig of a lengthy European tour, they exuded an energy that belied the heavy tour schedule.

With the confidence to debut a new track for the first time in front of a Glasgow audience that knows a good band when they see one, Spacek left the stage to familiar, yet fully merited, cries of ‘one more tune’.

A stellar Sunday night from a band – a mix of left-wing German militant Ulrike Meinhof and American actress Sissy Spacek – who will no doubt go on to grace venues fitting of their stature as one of the UK’s most invigorating, original and purposeful acts around today.