Tag Archives: Edinburgh

New on our radar: Stillhound

At last night’s Scottish Alternative Music Awards at The Garage in Glasgow, in between sterling sets by The Van Ts, Shogun and Baby Strange, the real highlight of the night were Stillhound.

The Edinburgh based ambient pop trio – made up of Fergus Cook, Laurie Corlett-Donald and Dave Lloyd – produced a set of lush synth pop hooks and organic electronica that had those in attendance in raptures, as they showcased songs off debut album Bury Everything (released via Lost Oscillation Records on 23rd September).

Featuring Cat Myres of Honeyblood fame on writing credits, Bury Everything offers up an irresistible slice of genre-defying soundscapes, fusing entrancing guitar progressions, fragile, dreamy vocals and samples.

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With a sound that recalls NZCA Lines and M83, alongside hints of 2 Door Cinema Club at their best,  the promise of the release of two singles off the album in October will no doubt see their stock rise even further.

 

 

Bury Everything Tracklisting:

  1. Spring Conscious
  2. Time Enough For Love
  3. Lofty Ambitions
  4. Think This Way
  5. Mountain Rescue
  6. Shy
  7. Summer Nightmares
  8. Seethe Unseen
  9. When Ghosts Get Angry
  10. Bury Everything

 

 

Man of Moon reach for the sky.

Man of Moon haven’t quite got the hang of using chopsticks, as the fresh-faced two piece from Edinburgh, looking decidedly jaded after an early morning return home from opening last night for The Twilight Sad in Manchester, tuck into some Asian inspired vegan food in Glasgow’s Hug and Pint, scene of tonight’s headline show and precursor to tomorrow night’s supporting slot for the Sad at a sold out Barrowlands.

Their mannerisms tell me they are not too sure about they are eating, but it tastes bloody good. Belly’s full and a pint down Chris and Mikey, who formed the band after being paired together during their sound engineering course, are ready to take a breather and look back on quite an eventful 2015, a year that saw both of them blow out just the 20 candles on their birthday cakes.

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So how does it feel being back on the road with the Sad again? “It’s been really good, they are such sound guys. It’s the same kind of crowd we get so people that go to see them dig us I think as well”, said Chris.

“It’s good for them to have us as well because it’s small, us being only a two-piece it’s really easy for them. Its good fun and not a lot of hassle, chips in Mikey.

Has there been anything learned from The Sad that they will bring to their own shows? The answer was a resounding “Oh aye, definitely” from both.

“I guess watching their live show and just seeing the stage presence they’ve got and watching them sound check and stuff. They are such pros. Learning that kind of stuff is so useful,” says Chris, with an air of gratitude for the Sad that speaks volumes.

The band were more than buzzing about tonight’s show, as they cast their minds back to the last time they played the Hug and Pint in April earlier this year, a gig that for them ranks as their highlight for 2015.

“That was an amazing gig. One of my favourites we have played, really really proud of it. The fact that we do so many support gigs, to play a sold out show in Glasgow is such a good feeling,” said Mikey.

Chris followed that by declaring his love of the city. “The crowd was so good. We are quite used to playing loads of shows in Edinburgh and seeing so many familiar faces, but to walk out into a sold out crowd and not knowing any people that were there…that’s when we knew we were doing something right.”

“Glasgow crowds are always the best crowds, it beats Edinburgh.”

Controversial, coming from a band that hail from the capital? Not to Mikey…

“I think just overall it’s a better scene and people are more into and from that we get a better response”.

Not taking anything away from tonight’s headline slot, it was obvious the bright neon lights of the Barras were more than visible on their respective horizons.

“Tonight’s a warm up for tomorrow. That’s the reason we booked tonight in the first place”, said Mikey.

Although I’m trying not to think about it until we walk out”. I think if it was further down South somewhere not so familiar  it wouldn’t be as nerve-racking, but Glasgow, it really is one the best places around”, thought Chris.

With Mikey adding, “The Barrowlands. The biggest gig of our career. Our families and friends are all going to be there as well. It’s such a good opportunity, with the amount of people that are going to be there who haven’t seen us before”.

Are The Sad in the same boat?  Not according to Mikey. “They are playing it cool I think”.

For The Moon, having their sound play out beneath the famous blue and white tiled ceiling is as big a deal as any band could ask for. “If you look at just a list of everybody who has played there. Playing on the same stage as all these legends. It’s just crazy, it’s cool.”

Perhaps the only down point for the band was not picking up the Best newcomer Act earlier this year at the Scottish Alternative Music Awards, although they felt Bella and the Bear were more than worthy winners. How they found out was a story in itself, as Chris shared.

“It would have been nice to get it. It was great to be voted though. I remember bus’ing it through from Edinburgh and the traffic was murder and I got into Glasgow late, so I had to sprint up Sauchiehall Street to try and make it to The Garage in time. When I got to the door someone just told me, ‘Aye you’ve no won’. And true enough, we went in and it turned out it had already been announced.”

What about their debut single, The Road, being heralded by one member of the music press as the best British debut since New Order released ‘Ceremony’ way back in 1981, many moons before Man of Moon came into the world.

“It was great. It’s mental. It was quite a statement. I genuinely don’t know what to take from that but it’s cool to see that someone likes it, said Chris. ”

And how did the song come about? Surprisingly easily.

“The Road was written really quickly. The basis of it anyway. We got it down in about 2 minutes. I mind doing it in Chris’s attic,” said Mikey.

With Chris adding, “I had just started using a Wah pedal that Mikey let me borrow and just switched that on and Mikey started playing along. It’s just mental the response we have had from it.”

As for 2016, the band see themselves doing at least a few festivals as they take their sound out to fans across the country.

“Really keen to do Green Man next year. It’s such a good festival and I think it would really suit us”, said Chris, with Mike adding, “I’d love to play Secret Garden Party again but like a different slot. We opened up for the festival pretty much last time and pretty much nobody was there.”

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Fans will be happy to note that the band expect to release a four track EP early next year, which they will be touring at a later date, with Mikey confirming it, “It’s completely recorded, it’s just getting mixed and mastered. I don’t think there’s a real rush to get it out but when it does I think that will give people something to listen to”.

With Andy Monaghan from Frightened Rabbit on production duties, the band felt that he got the best out of them. It was amazing, he would fire ideas at us and we would be like ‘We didn’t think of that’.  He was just really encouraging. That’s what you need,” said Chris.

And even though they have been playing together for the past three years, the band still don’t see themselves as the finished article quite yet.

“I think we are still essentially finding what we are sounding like. We still buying more pedals and expanding our sound. Even now, some of our tracks sound really different from each other, they could almost be put into two different sets,” answers Chris.

As for influences from fellow Scottish acts out with the likes of The Sad and Frightened Rabbit, the band were keen to add The Phantom Band, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Errors and Kathryn Joseph to that list, with Mikey keen to thank them for their support.

“Playing with these bands makes us feel so lucky. Its crazy as well cause a lot of these bands have been playing for years and we are just really starting. For that we are pretty grateful”.

As the band put in their pretty low key rider request with a joint “Tennents” shout, their final assertion, in response to a heady future on making more waves in the music world, was a firm “We are ready to go”.

With some bands making relatively small steps up the music ladder, Man of Moon have been leaving footprints the likes of which others could only wish for. One giant step after another it seems indeed, for a band that, with a night at the Barras soon to be under their belt, have the sky as their limit.

Crash Club on a collision course with the big time.

Ask the movers and shakers of Glasgow to sum up how buoyant the local music scene is at the moment and, for many, two words will give you the answer you’re looking for: Crash Club.

The band, who formed in 2010, seem to be subconsciously providing the soundtrack to the city, with their strobe-heavy, swagger-inducing, energetic live shows continuing to win over audiences and help cement their status as one of the best bands in the country.

Collaborations with the likes of Tony Costello from Tijuana Bibles and Ian Mackinnon from Medicine Men show that they well and truly have their finger on the pulse musically, helping to hone and add another dimension to their sound – one that offers shades of Primal Scream’s XTRMNTR mixed with a heavy dose of The Chemical Brothers – as well as their live performances.

It’s a case of so far so good then for bassist Neal McHarg, “We’ve already done a lot of things we’d have put down on a musically bucket list kinda thing, like releasing a 12” record, and playing with bands that got us into dance music, being involved in festival season and to play T in the Park.”

This week saw a step up to the mantle in more ways than one for the electro-rock outfit, after they picked up the ‘Best Electronic’ act accolade at the recent Scottish Alternative Music Awards, where they also performed at alongside the likes of Holy Esque and Hector Bizerk.

This came hot on the heels of a support slot with The View in Edinburgh, alongside a barnstorming midnight show at the day-long Tenement Trail festival in Glasgow, which, I’m told, left even an attending Mhairi Black MP with her tongue wagging.

Surprising, it seems, is bassist Neal’s level-headedness amidst all the commotion.

“We just get on with it, to be honest,” he explains, “the hype could die down as quickly as it started. I’ve been around long enough to see it with bands I really believed were going to break through so I think for us we’ve got to keep writing better tracks and come up with new ways to make the live shows better.”

Meanwhile, the band are currently knuckled down in Glasgow’s Rocket Science studios, working on their new EP, which, by Neal’s own admission, is sounding “massive”.

“It is heading towards a New York sound, one where you really feel the beats and it’s hard not to groove,” he reveals. “It resembles the sound you probably would think of when you listen to DFA Record’s acts like LCD Soundsystem, Holy Ghost and The Rapture, although a bit darker in tones.”

When probed about possible future collaborations, he isn’t giving anything away.

“We are lucky to have some of the best acts in Scotland involved with us,” he boasts, “but I’ll keep that hush hush until it’s all finished.”

And with an upcoming King Tut’s headline slot on November 6th, alongside the promise of more late night shows in the near future, the hype surrounding Crash Club sees no signs of being written off.